Divine Mercy Sunday (Year B)

Divine Mercy Sunday

Acts 4:32-35 Psalm 118:2-4, 13-15, 22-24 1 John 5:1-6 John 20:19-31

Today, we are celebrating Divine Mercy Sunday. May Divine Mercy be the lens through which we interpret today’s Scriptural readings.

         In the light of Divine Mercy, how should we interpret the Apostle Thomas who was not with the other disciples when the risen Jesus appeared to them? When the disciples excitedly told Thomas that they had seen the risen Lord Jesus, Thomas responded by insisting that “Unless I see the mark of the nails in Jesus’ hands and puts my finger into the nail marks and put my hand into Jesus’ side, I will not believe” that Jesus has risen from the dead. Then, a week later, the risen Jesus appears again and invites Thomas to place his fingers into his hands and his hand into his side and believe. Thomas responds in faith with “My Lord and my God”

         As Brant Pitre, encourages us, may we describe Thomas not by the faith Thomas lacked but rather by the faith that Thomas demonstrated by exclaiming that Jesus is divine with “My Lord and my God”.

         Divine Mercy highlights the good present in the world and encourages good that can be present if encouraged. Today, may we call Thomas not doubting Thomas but as Pitre states, “believing Thomas”.[1]

         We can apply the same Divine Mercy, goodness affirming attitude, not only to the Apostle Saint Thomas, the Believing Thomas but also to the first of the Apostles, Saint Peter.

         As observed by my founder, Father Menard, often we interpret the Gospel passage of Peter walking on water to Jesus and then sinking by Jesus’s side as the time when Peter doubted – but are we not forgetting what is much more important? Since Peter believed he, unlike the other disciples, climbed out of the comfort and security of a fishing boat, stood on water and walked on water towards Jesus and almost made it all the way to Jesus.[2]

We know this since Scripture states that all Jesus had to do to save Peter was to reach out his hand and “immediately” catch Peter while saying “O man of little faith, why did you doubt”. Jesus said these words not in reference to Peter’s faith that moved Peter to get out of his boat and walk on water but rather in reference to Peter’s lack of faith when Peter had almost reached Jesus. Jesus said these words to encourage Peter to even greater faith and to encourage the faith of the disciples who were still safely in their boat who responded in faith with “Truly you are the Son of God.”[3]

Today, may we see all of reality through the eyes of Divine Mercy and when we speak, may the words we choose be for the purpose not to discourage or dismiss people for their lack of goodness or lack of faith but rather be words that encourage people to greater goodness, to greater faith, to develop their potential, to blossom, to flourish into the disciple of Jesus that God wants.

Lord Jesus, on Divine Mercy Sunday may we think more with your merciful mind, see through your merciful eyes, love through your merciful heart, and reach out to people with your merciful hands. – Blessings – Fr Peter

Credits

Mừng Chúa Phục Sinh (Tuấn Kim) & Presto (J.S. Bach)

Brant Pitre, “The Second Sunday of Easter, (Year B),” catholicproductions.com.

Menard, Peter, Disciple, and Pastor-1976, 12-13.

Menard, Peter, Disciple, and Pastor-1976, 12-13.

2nd Sunday of Easter (Year B) Divine Mercy Sunday

Acts 4:32-35 Psalm 118:2-4, 13-15, 22-24 1 John 5:1-6 John 20:19-31

I. Introduction

A. Divine Mercy Sunday – Interpretive Lens – Context – Scripture 

II. How Interpret Apostle Thomas

A. Disciples – Seen Risen Lord

B. Thomas – “Unless I see the mark of the nails in Jesus’ hands and puts my finger into the nail marks and put my hand into Jesus’ side, I will not believe” that Jesus has risen from the dead.

C. Week Later Risen Jesus Appears Invites Thomas – Responds in Faith with “My Lord and my God”

III. Not Doubting Thomas but Believing Thomas (Pitre)

         A. Divine Mercy highlights the good present in the world and encourages good that can be present if encouraged. 

IV. Apply to Saint Peter (Menard)

         A. Typically Interpret – Peter’s Lack of Faith – Sank

         B. Miss What is More Important – Because of Faith – Out of Comfort – Security of Boat

Almost Reached Jesus “Immediately” – Reached Out – 

Since Peter believed he, unlike the other disciples, climbed out of the comfort and security of a fishing boat, stood on water and walked on water towards Jesus and almost made it all the way to Jesus.[4]

… while saying “O man of little faith, why did you doubt”. Jesus said these words not in reference to Peter’s faith that moved Peter to get out of his boat and walk on water but rather in reference to Peter’s lack of faith when Peter had almost reached Jesus. Jesus said these words to encourage Peter to even greater faith and to encourage the faith of the disciples who were still safely in their boat who responded in faith with “Truly you are the Son of God.”[5]

Today, may we see all of reality through the eyes of Divine Mercy and when we speak, may the words we choose be for the purpose not to discourage or dismiss people for their lack of goodness or lack of faith but rather be words that encourage people to greater goodness, to greater faith, to develop their potential, to blossom, to flourish into the disciple of Jesus that God wants.

Lord Jesus, on Divine Mercy Sunday may we think more with your merciful mind, see through your merciful eyes, love through your merciful heart, and reach out to people with your merciful hands.

God Bless – Fr Peter


[1] Brant Pitre, “The Second Sunday of Easter, (Year B),” catholicproductions.com.

[2] Menard, Peter, Disciple, and Pastor-1976, 12-13.

[3] Menard, Peter, Disciple, and Pastor-1976, 12-13.

[4] Menard, Peter, Disciple, and Pastor-1976, 12-13.

[5] Menard, Peter, Disciple, and Pastor-1976, 12-13.

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